A Constraint-Based Approach for Signal Acquisition Control in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy (MRI/MRS)

Authors: 

Xiaowei Song
Evangelos Milios
Malcolm Heywood
Benjamin Rusak

Author Addresses: 

Xiaowei Song
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University, and
Geriatric Medicine Research Unit
Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2E1, Canada
xsong@dal.ca

Evangelos Milios
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
6050 University Ave.
PO Box 15000
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
B3H 4R2
eem@cs.dal.ca

Malcolm Heywood
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
6050 University Ave.
PO Box 15000
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
B3H 4R2
mheywood@cs.dal.ca

Benjamin Rusak
Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology
Dalhousie University
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3H 4J1
Benjamin.Rusak@dal.ca

Abstract: 

Magnetic resonance imaging technology is one of the most promising investigative and diagnostic methodologies in brain research and in clinical neurological practice. To acquire informative magnetic resonance signals, a variety of equipment parameters require identification. However, depending on which neuronal metabolites and brain tissues are of interest and on what types of clinical or research questions are being asked, the relation between equipment parameters is often complex. This complexity means that computerized tools that can design valid novel settings to control the activities of the magnet during data acquisition would be beneficial. The goal of the present research is to build such a tool using constraint satisfaction based on the constraints associated with different imaging protocols. A constraint-resolving program, which is generated automatically from the constraints provided by the user in text form, enumerates the value domains of the variables, enforces the constraints associated with each possible setting, and produces a complete set of all valid parameter settings for controlling the magnetic device during signal acquisition.

Tech Report Number: 
CS-2003-02
Report Date: 
March 5, 2003
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